Porsche 911: The Complete History

Porsche AG

 

The Porsche 911, also known as “the nine-eleven”, is Porsche's best-known model and is considered the epitome of the brand. It has been around for almost 60 years and the saga is still going strong these days. The latest model series 992 has been available since 2019 and they already sold over 30K units just in the USA.

The first 911 was presented in September 1963, at the IAA in Frankfurt, Germany as the successor to the Porsche 356 with the designation Porsche 901. However, three-digit numbers with a zero in the middle were protected as a type designation for Peugeot, so the car came onto the market in 1964 with its now-legendary name, the Porsche 911.

Porsche actually took a simple design and developed it into the best handling car possible with the 911. That basic recipe turned out to be the best driver’s car and everyone that get to drive it, loved it.

The car is a typical 2+2 seater with two seats and two jump seats. It is powered by a 6-cylinder boxer engine at the rear. With the rear-engine design, the 911 continues a classic design principle that can already be found in earlier Porsche developments, for example, the VW Beetle and the Porsche 356. 

The Porsche 911 usually has rear-wheel drive but since 1989 vehicles with all-wheel drive (Carrera 4) have also been available. Also, the Turbo era of the 70s and 80s was a deciding factor in 911’s future. The top model since 1974 has been the 911 Turbo. Body variants of the Porsche 911 are the coupe, the cabriolet, and the Targa.

 

Porsche 911

Porsche AG

 

Even before 911, Porsche vehicles had the reputation of being particularly sporty. This was established by numerous race victories with racing cars such as the Porsche 904 and the Porsche 906 in the early 1960s on racetracks around the world, including the Nürburgring- Nordschleife and the Targa Florio.

One goal of motorsport for Porsche was to incorporate the experience and knowledge gained in the development of racing cars into production vehicles. This knowledge was applied in the development of the Porsche 911. As a result, the overall construction of the 911 was suitable for use in races without major changes.

This tradition of establishing a close connection between road vehicles and pure racing vehicles based on the 911 has continued unbroken in the history of the Porsche 911. Overall, the 911 with its racing versions is the most successful racing car ever built. 

The Porsche 911 and its offshoots, such as the Porsche 934 and 935 models, have historically been used successfully as racing cars in the sportscar championships all around the world. Nowadays, racing cars based on the 911 are mainly used in one-make cups such as the Carrera Cup.

 

The Idea of Porsche 911

Porsche 911

Porsche AG

 

At the end of the 1950s, Porsche began to develop a successor to the 356, which had been produced almost unchanged since 1950 and was no longer up to date. Above all, the 4-cylinder boxer engine could no longer be developed and manufactured cost-effectively due to its design. With two liters it was at the end of its displacement and power development. 

The new model had a challenge right from the beginning. It should be superior to the older 356 in all areas without giving up the typical basic shape of a Porsche. It also had 2 very prominent designers compete with one another internally and that sure did create some tension.  

As head of the Porsche body construction department, Erwin Komenda was initially entrusted with developing the design of the Porsche Type 901. At the same time, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (Ferdinand junior, called Butzi), the son of Ferry Porsche, was also developing, a model of the new car, whereby he had to stick to a few specifications, including a wheelbase no longer than 7.2 ft, engine and drive at the rear. 

Both designers influenced each other with their designs. Ultimately, Ferdinand junior's design was chosen because it best suited the character of a Porsche automobile, and the relationship to the 356 was immediately recognizable. 

The new car was about six inches longer and six inches narrower than the 356, had larger windows that helped improve all-around visibility and had a larger trunk. The design of the interior was also revised and adapted to the taste of the 1960s. 

 

Porsche 911 (1963–1973)

Porsche 911: The Complete History

Porsche AG

  

The first 911 version built-in series from September 1964 was the original model presented at the IAA in 1963 with a 130 hp 2-liter six-cylinder boxer engine. At the same time, the previous four-cylinder remained on offer, and these vehicles were sold as the Porsche 912. 

Unlike the Porsche 356, which was still based on the VW Beetle in terms of body and chassis, the 911/912 had a self-supporting body, triangular wishbone suspensions, and damper struts at the front with semi-trailing arms at the rear. The new 911 also had a rack and pinion steering which gave it the best handling abilities available at the time.

With its streamlined silhouette, the new Porsche set new standards in automotive design even then. The shapely exterior of the first 911 is made possible by its unique drive concept, which, thanks to the air-cooled boxer engine installed in the rear, can completely do without a front radiator grille.

In the summer of 1966, the same displacement but more powerful 911 S was added. The higher compression engine of this sportier version delivered 118 kW (160 hp) and it was more extensively equipped than the simple model. At the same time, the Targa version was added to the line.

 

Porsche 911: The Complete History

Porsche AG

 

The 911 basic model with a 130 hp engine was given the designation 911 L (Luxury) in the 1968 model year; at the same time, the 911 T (Touring) with a 110 hp six-cylinder boxer engine and four-speed gearbox was available as a comparatively inexpensive model. 

From the year 1969, the 911 L with a carburetor engine was replaced by the 911 E with 140 hp (103 kW) and mechanical intake manifold injection, which Porsche also used in the 170 hp (125 kW) 911 S from then on. 

The engine output of the individual models continued to increase in the years that followed due to increased displacement. In addition to engine power, the T, E, and S models also differed in terms of equipment. A total of 111,995 vehicles of the original 911 were produced between 1963 and 1973.

 

The Legendary Ducktail: 911 Carrera RS 2.7

The Legendary Ducktail: 911 Carrera RS 2.7

Porsche AG

 

In October 1972, a special sports version of the 911, the Carrera RS 2.7, was presented at the Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris. An even sportier model than the 911 S, it was based on the normal Porsche 911 and 911 S. Today it is also affectionately known as the "ducktail" because of its special rear spoiler. 

The concept, on which the modern GT3 and GT3 RS models are also based, was designed to combine more power with less weight than the normal 911s. This gave the car legendary status for Porsche lovers because it really was extremely light. 

For example, there was no spare wheel, insulating material, or hinged rear side windows to save weight. In addition, thin sheet metal and GRP parts were installed to save even more pounds. Today's models, for example, do without conventional door handles and instead only have a fabric loop with which to pull the door shut.

The 2200 lbs, 210-hp sports car with a top speed of over 155 mph rolled out of the factory gates in Zuffenhausen, Germany 1,525 times and now it is a classic. 

This year in 2022, the Ducktail is celebrating its 50th year on the market and Porsche has already revealed that they are paying a homage to the 911 Carrera RS 2.7 with their 2023 911 Sports Classic which will feature the crucial ducktail spoiler.

 

Porsche 911 G-Series (1973 - 1989) 

Porsche 911 G-Series

Porsche AG

 

The 911 was fundamentally revised for the 1974 model year. Although, strictly speaking, only the vehicles from the 1974 model year form the G series, all 911s from the years 1974 to 1989 are generally referred to as the G series or G model.

The most striking external distinguishing feature is the higher and massive bumpers, which merge into the body via black plastic bellows. They were necessary to meet new US NHTSA regulations. These determined that a front or rear impact with a solid obstacle up to a speed of 5 mph should not result in body damage. 

In order to meet this requirement, cars for the US market had their bumpers connected to the vehicle body via hydraulic impact absorbers. The impact absorbers were replaced with less expensive impact tubes on models not intended for US export. These had to be replaced even after a parking accident, which was not necessary with the resetting impact absorbers. The impact absorbers could be ordered as an extra.

The car was only on the market in the variants 911, 911 S, and the new top model 911 Carrera. The displacement of the six-cylinder boxer engine, which was still air-cooled, was also increased to 2.7 liters in the less powerful variants. The 911 had an output of 110 kW (150 hp), the 911 S 128 kW (175 hp), and the Carrera 154 kW (210 hp).

As with its predecessor, the body of the new Carrera was widened by a total of 1.6 inches to accommodate the larger tires on the rear fenders. Where the registration regulations permitted, it was also equipped with a distinctive front spoiler lip attached to the hood. At 2370 lbs, the new Carrera was just as heavy as the 911 RS touring and therefore offered the same driving performance.

 

Porsche 911 G-Series

Porsche AG

 

For the 1976 model year, the displacement of the 911 Carrera was increased to 3 liters. At a speed of 6000 rpm, the engine in this version delivered 147 kW (200 hp), ie slightly less than the previous Carrera 2.7 RS model. The engine with 110 kW (150 hp) was no longer offered. The weakest engine available was the 2.7-liter engine from the previous year's 911 S, whose output was now specified at 121 kW (165 hp) without any technical changes. 

The semi-automatic Sportomatic, available as an option for both models, only had three gears. Supporting body parts were hot-dip galvanized on both sides and Porsche was, therefore, able to offer a long-term guarantee of six years against rusting through. In the USA, the 912 E with the 1971 cc engine from VW from the Porsche 914 was offered in the 1976 model year.

Since the Porsche model range already included the 924 and 928, the 911 range was streamlined from the model year 1978: the Carrera was dropped – the 911 was only available as an SC and Turbo. 

The 911 SC had the wide body of the Carrera and a three-liter engine with 132 kW (180 hp) with mechanical K-Jetronic.The car was surpassed in terms of performance and top speed by the Porsche 928, which the Porsche management wanted to replace the 911 in the 1980s.

In 1980, the performance of the SC was increased to 138 kW (188 hp) and in the following year 1981, it was further increased to 150 kW (204 hp) by switching from regular to premium gasoline. The semi-automatic Sportomatic was eliminated. The long-term guarantee against rusting through the bodywork could be extended to seven years by using steel sheets hot-dip galvanized on both sides. This was later extended to ten years.

 

Porsche

 Porsche AG

 

Management plans were to phase out the 911 in 1981. The future model range was only going to consist of modern, water-cooled cars with front engines, namely the 924, 944, and 928. After internal changes that led to the replacement of the CEO at the end of 1980, this plan was changed. 

As a signal for the realignment, Porsche presented the study of a 911 Cabriolet with a turbo engine and all-wheel drive at the IAA in Frankfurt in 1981. From 1983, the cabriolet was offered as the third body variant for the SC in addition to the Coupe and Targa. For the 1984 model year, the designation was changed from SC to Carrera and the displacement of the naturally aspirated engine was increased to 3.2 liters, which delivered 170 kW (231 hp). 

The fully electronic engine management system Motronic (DME) from Bosch took the place of the mechanical K-Jetronic. The DME reduced fuel consumption compared to the previous SC model. Due to stricter emission regulations in the USA, a catalytic converter for the 911 was offered for the first time. These models had a lower output than the cars without a catalytic converter. It was initially 152 kW (207 hp), but this was increased to 160 kW (217 hp) in 1986.

In 1989, the G model was sold in a limited small series as a puristic, roadster-like variant under the name Speedster, which differed from the 911 Cabriolet primarily in its shortened windshield frame and two humps on the hood flap. Porsche also offered the Carrera with the wide fenders and braking system of the 911 Turbo. Due to the somewhat higher air resistance, the Carrera Turbo was somewhat slower than the standard version with the same engine output.

These models and also vehicles from special series, such as the limited edition Ferry Porsche and the slightly lighter 911 Carrera Clubsport, which is equipped with a modified Motronic, are sought-after collector's items and can only rarely be found on the road.

 

Porsche 911 Turbo (1974)

Porsche 911 G-Series

Porsche AG

 

After the BMW 2002 turbo was presented in 1973, Porsche became the second manufacturer to install a turbocharger in a production vehicle the following year. The new Porsche 911 Turbo, developed under the internal number 930, was presented at the Paris Motor Show in 1974. 

In the early 1970s, Porsche achieved great success with turbocharging in racing cars such as the Porsche 917/10 and 917/30 and gained experience that flowed into series production. The Porsche Turbo was also the first sports car with a standard boost pressure control. 

The car with a displacement of 3 liters initially had an output of 191 kW (260 hp). The power was brought to 220 kW (300 hp) for the 1978 model year by increasing the compression ratio, increasing the displacement to 3.3 liters, and using an intercooler, which also required a larger rear wing.

The fuel consumption of the turbo engines is significantly higher than that of a 911 without turbocharging. Typical features of the 911 Turbo are the widened front and rear fenders and the large rear spoiler with an even more massive rubber tear-off edge.

 

Porsche 959 (1987)

Porsche

Porsche AG

 

One of the best-known developments based on the 911 is the Porsche 959, which was presented in 1983 at the IAA in Frankfurt as a Group B study. At the beginning of the 1980s, Porsche planned not only to win many circuit races but also to be successful in rallying. For this purpose, vehicle development designed a completely new vehicle with the designation 959 based on the 911. 

In order to achieve homologation for group B, at least 200 road-legal vehicles had to be built. The design of the 959 contained many technical innovations for the time and was considered a benchmark in automotive engineering. The first road vehicles were not delivered until April 1987, as series production was not possible due to the technical complexity.

The 959 was powered by a six-cylinder boxer engine with a displacement of 2.85 liters, which achieved an output of 331 kW (450 hp) thanks to two turbochargers and an intercooler. The vehicle had all-wheel drive , which automatically adapted to the road conditions. The braking system was already equipped with an anti-lock braking system.

The 959 won the Paris-Dakar Rally in 1986 after the vehicles had faced a DNF (did not finish) in the previous year.

 

Porsche 964 (1988 -1994)

GT Series

Porsche AG

 

In 1989, Porsche embarked on a new marketing strategy with the 964, after all, Porsche models had run under the internal development number in the years before; except for the 930, which was already sold as the 911 Turbo. 

Sharply declining sales figures at the end of the 1980s - especially for the 944 and 928 models - and a resulting serious crisis were reasons not to give up the classic 911 and to offer the 964 as the new Porsche 911.

The 964 was a completely new vehicle compared to the previous model, consisting of 80 percent new parts. However, the body shape remained almost unchanged except for the bumpers. The interior and the vehicle instruments have also been carefully revised and are still very reminiscent of the predecessor. 

The most noticeable revision was in the technology department. The car had an anti-lock braking system (ABS) and power steering as standard. Also, from 1991 airbags became standard, which was not yet available on the previous models. 

The chassis was completely redesigned and received, among other things, coil springs instead of the torsion bar suspension. The still air-cooled six-cylinder boxer engine had a displacement of 3.6 liters and delivered 184 kW (250 hp).

 

GT Series

Porsche AG

 

The car was available in two versions; rear (Carrera 2) or all-wheel drive (Carrera 4). Both versions could be ordered as a coupe, Targa, or cabriolet. In 1993, the last year of production of the 964, the car was produced as a Speedster in a small series of 930 units.

In 1991, a turbo with the 3.3-liter engine from the Porsche 930 was offered as the top model, which in this revised version had an output of 235 kW (320 hp). The car was criticized because its driving performance no longer stood out as was the case with the previous model. 

After two years of production, it was replaced by the Turbo 3.6 in the model year 1993, the engine of which was based on the 964 naturally aspirated engine models with a displacement of 3.6 liters and developed an output of 265 kW (360 hp).

The fuel consumption of all 964 models was further reduced compared to the previous models. In addition to the mass-produced vehicles, other small-series vehicles were built on the 964 platforms, such as the Carrera RS or Turbo S, which were specially developed for drivers with sporting ambitions.

 

Porsche 993 (1993 - 1998) 

GT

Porsche AG

 

The Porsche 993 replaced the Porsche 964 in 1993. It is the last 911 with an air-cooled engine, which is why it has a special appeal for some fans of pure Porsche sports cars.

The 993 was improved in many details that were new to the 964 and still caused problems. This gave the 993 a reputation as a particularly mature and reliable sports car among the 911 models.

The body is a much-praised design by Harm Lagaay, which is particularly striking due to the harmonious integration of the bumpers into the body. Despite their width, the rear fenders do not appear exaggerated, so that the vehicle gives off a harmonious overall picture. 

In contrast to the previous models, the front section is flatter, which was only made possible by the use of the new elliptical headlights instead of the round headlights previously used. The car was sold in the body versions of Coupe, Targa, and Cabriolet.

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The engine of the 993, which was equipped with hydraulic tappets, achieved an output of 200 kW (272 hp) from a displacement of 3.6 liters. From the model year 1996, it had 210 kW (285 hp) with the same displacement, partly because of the improved intake system. A six-speed gearbox was now standard on both the naturally aspirated and turbocharged models.

As with the 964, the 993 was offered with rear or all-wheel drive. In 1996, Porsche recalled the tradition of designating more powerful and higher-quality vehicles with an additional S. With 210 kW (285 hp), the engine corresponded to the standard Carrera models. However, the car had a wider body than the Turbo, and it also had a more powerful brake system.

Traditionally, the most powerful 911 model in a series is equipped with a turbo engine. In the 993, the turbo had an output of 300 kW (408 hp) and exceeded the 400 hp mark for the first time since the Porsche 959. 

The engine was equipped with two turbochargers (bi-turbo) and intercoolers. Arranged under the fixed rear wing, which externally distinguishes the Turbo from the other 993s, these completely obscure the view of the engine.

 

GT Series

GT

Porsche AG

 

Porsche brought out the Carrera RS and 911 GT2 models for customers who want to drive their Porsche more on the racetrack than on public roads. Both vehicles were lighter than the production models and had a comparatively higher engine output. The Carrera RS had an engine with a displacement of 3.8 liters and 221 kW (300 hp) without supercharging, while the GT2 is supplied with two turbochargers like the turbo.

 

Porsche 996 (1997 - 2006)

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The era of air-cooled engines in the Porsche 911 ended with the 996 in 1997. Starting with this model, Porsche put a water-cooled engine in the rear of the car. The number of cylinders remained at six and the principle of the boxer arrangement was retained.

The engine with a displacement of 3.4 liters delivered 220 kW (300 hp) at 6800 rpm. With the 2002 model year, the engine output was increased to 235 kW (320 hp) and the displacement to 3.6 liters. 

Despite heavily revised lines, especially in the front and rear, the exterior of the 996 still shows the distinctive features of the 911. Overall, the 996 is larger than the previous models and has been further improved in terms of aerodynamics.

In order to reduce production costs, many parts of the Porsche Boxster were adopted during the 996 development. This was evident in the headlights – often called fried egg lights because of their shape – which meant that the front view of the 911 could hardly be distinguished from the Boxster. 

Customer criticism prompted Porsche to replace a few technical changes with the 2002 model year, especially the headlights with newly designed ones so that an independent 911 design was given again.

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

When developing the 996, the focus was on suitability for everyday use and driving comfort. The car can therefore be compared more to a grand tourer like the Porsche 928 than to a purebred sports car like its predecessors.

The interior, especially the dashboard with the instruments and the center console, was redesigned and no longer bore any resemblance to that of the 911, 964, and 993 series. The 996 was sold as a coupe, Targa, and cabriolet with rear or all-wheel drive. 

In addition to the standard Carrera models, there was also the 4S version, which stood out from the crowd. This model had the wide body and braking system of the Turbo and all-wheel drive. Only the missing fixed rear spoiler and the missing air inlets in the area of ​​the rear fenders differed between the two models. The rear of the Carrera 4S also had the continuous light strip that had been omitted from the other 996 vehicles.

The Turbo based on the 996 was only offered three years after the first Carrera model. The engine of this car delivered 309 kW (420 hp) and 331 kW (450 hp) in the more powerful S version. The car had four-wheel drive as standard and a wider body than the Carrera models and could be ordered as a coupe or cabriolet. The rear wing was smaller than the previous turbos and no longer dominated the entire rear. 

 

GT Series

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

For customers who were enthusiastic about racing, Porsche developed sport variants of the 996 based on the GT motorsport. These GT models had more power than the production models and were prepared for track use.

The Porsche 911 GT3 had a naturally aspirated six-cylinder boxer engine initially with 265 kW (360 hp). From 2002, the engine in the GT3 had an output of 280 kW (381 hp). In terms of engine performance, the GT3 was surpassed by the Porsche 911 GT2. The GT2 had a six-cylinder boxer engine with turbocharging, which delivered 340 kW (462 hp) and 355 kW (483 hp) later.

All GT models could be ordered with an optional Clubsport package and did not have the electronic driver aids that were standard on the mass-produced models.

 

Porsche 997 (2004 - 2012)

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

With the 997 series, the vehicle design was again based more on the Porsche 993 in order to emphasize the traditional features of the 911 more, which some customers missed in the 996 type. The front end with the round headlights in particular is reminiscent of the classic Porsche 911.

From a technical point of view, little has changed compared to its predecessor, the 996. The engine was still a water-cooled flat-six engine. However, the structure of the model range was changed and these were aligned with those of the Porsche Boxster and the Porsche Cayenne. 

The name-determining element has primarily been engine performance. More powerful models get the suffix S or GTS. In addition, the cabriolet body shape and the all-wheel-drive type determine the further additions to the model name.

The Porsche 911 Carrera was offered in two performance variants, the Carrera and the Carrera S. The 3.6-liter engine in the Carrera has a maximum output of 239 kW (325 hp) and the 3.8-liter engine in the Carrera S has a maximum output of 261 kW (355 hp). ​​Both models were available in coupe and cabriolet body styles and could be ordered with rear or all-wheel drive.

From November 2006, the 997 series was supplemented by the Targa 4 and Targa 4S models, which were only delivered with all-wheel drive. External differences to the 997 Carrera can be found in the large glass panorama roof and in the silhouette, which was characterized by the pointed rear side windows and the two-sided, anodized and polished aluminum trim strips. The engine of the Targa 4 made 239 kW (325 hp) like the Carrera and the Targa 4S was produced with the more powerful engine of the Carrera S with 261 kW (355 hp).

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

In 2009, the model series underwent a facelift. Apart from modified air intakes and redesigned LED taillights and LED daytime running lights, there were major technical changes. The engines of the Carrera and Carrera S were converted to direct injection. This increased the output of the Carrera to 254 kW (345 hp) and that of the Carrera S to 283 kW (385 hp). 

The Targa 4 and Targa 4S were also revised and delivered with the more powerful engines. In the same model year, the Carrera S was available with engine output increased by 16 kW (23 hp) to 300 kW (408 hp). 

In the same year, the Carrera GTS was newly introduced to the model range by Porsche. This car, which was produced both as a coupe and as a cabriolet, had the performance enhanced boxer engine from the Carrera S, which delivered 300 kW (408 hp) at a speed of 7300 rpm. With the standard six-speed manual transmission, the car reached a top speed of 306 km/h. 

The vehicle filled the performance gap between the Carrera S and the GT3. The most striking distinguishing feature was the bodywork on the rear axle, which was 1.7 inches wider than that of the Carrera S. The GTS could be ordered with rear or all-wheel drive.

The interior of the 997 was again extensively revised compared to the previous series, as this was criticized by many customers. When it came to the design, Porsche also followed the 993 here. The speedometer instruments and the switches in the center console were changed. As a novelty, an instrument cluster with a 4.6-inch TFT color screen has been integrated, which can display data from the onboard computer, navigation and audio systems, and warnings.

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG



The 3.6-liter Biturbo engine installed in the 911 Turbo had an output of 353 kW (480 hp). This turbo was the first mass-produced vehicle with a gasoline engine to have adjustable guide vanes on the exhaust gas turbines of the two turbochargers. These ensured more spontaneous response behavior and better torque in the lower speed range. The 997 Turbo accelerated to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds and the maximum speed was 193 mph.

After the 2009 model revision, the displacement of the engine was increased to 3.8 liters, which increased the engine output of the turbo to 368 kW (500 hp). In addition, the Turbo S was introduced, whose 3.8-liter engine delivered 390 kW (530 hp). Both the Turbo and the Turbo S could be ordered as a coupe or cabriolet. 

Compared to the Carrera models, the Turbo has a wider body on the front and rear axles. Furthermore, the front and rear fairings were lowered to the street level and contain larger ventilation openings. There are air inlets on both sides in front of the rear axle, which clearly distinguishes the Turbo from the side view of the 911 with naturally aspirated engines. 

Traditionally, a large rear spoiler is mounted on the trunk, which extends at 75 mph on the 997 Turbo and retracts at 35 mph. In all 997 models, the fuel consumption could be reduced compared to 996 models, despite the increase in power. 

 

GT Series

GT Series

Porsche AG

 

In addition to the large series models, several small series were made specifically for racing use. As with the 996, these were divided into vehicles with a naturally aspirated six-cylinder boxer engine ( Porsche 911 GT3 ) and vehicles with a turbocharged six-cylinder boxer engine ( Porsche 911 GT2 ). Both models are rear-wheel drive. 

These model series can be distinguished from the standard models by the large rear spoiler and wide body with large openings for brake and engine cooling. The interior is spartan and designed purely for sports use. Bucket sports seats are included instead of the standard sports seats. There are no seats in the rear. A safety cage has been installed on all models.

The 911 GT3 was presented in March 2006 at the Geneva Motor Show. Compared to its direct 996 predecessors, this is 25 kW (34 hp) more powerful and thus delivers 305 kW (415 hp) from a displacement of 3.6 liters. 

After the model revision, the engine output of the GT3 increased to 320 kW (435 hp) with a simultaneous increase in displacement to 3.8 liters. The GT3 was later replaced by the GT3 RS and GT3 RS 4.0, whose power increased to 331 kW (450 hp) and 386 kW (500 hp) respectively. 

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The cubic capacity of the GT3 RS remained unchanged and GT3 RS 4.0 has been increased to 4 liters. This is the first time Porsche has developed a naturally aspirated engine with a performance that previously could only be achieved using a turbocharger. This performance car accelerates from zero to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds.

The GT2 of the 997 series, introduced in 2007, was also later produced in 2010 as the GT2 RS with a larger engine output. The first model delivered 390 kW (530 hp) and the successor model delivered 456 kW (620 hp) with an unchanged displacement of 3.6 liters. The GT2 RS was limited to 500 units.

In addition, several special models of the 997 were produced. Some stylistic elements such as the rear spoiler of the 911 Carrera RS from 1973 were taken up in the 911 Sport Classic. Only 250 of this special model were made. The body of the 911 Speedster was delivered with the typical shortened windshield frame and two humps on the hood flap. The car was limited to 356 pieces.

 

Porsche 991 (2011 - 2019)

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The Porsche 991 is the seventh generation of the Porsche 911 since its debut in 1963. Porsche presented it at the 64th  IAA in Frankfurt. Thanks to the new body shell in a mixed aluminum and steel construction, around 170 lbs could be saved compared to the body shell of the previous 997 models. Overall, the Porsche 991 was around 90 lbs lighter. To build this new type of body, Porsche introduced new manufacturing methods to assemble the parts.

The 991 was initially only offered as a coupe in two different model versions, the 911 Carrera with 257 kW (350 hp) and the 911 Carrera S with 294 kW (400 hp). As is typical for the 911, the two model variants have a six-cylinder boxer engine with a displacement of 3.4 liters in the Carrera and 3.8 liters in the Carrera S at the rear of the vehicle. 

To accelerate from zero to 60 mph with a manual transmission, the 911 Carrera needs 4.8 seconds and the more powerful S model 4.5 seconds. The Porsche 991 was also the first production vehicle with a seven-speed manual transmission.

Since the beginning of 2012, the 991 has also been available in two convertible versions with the same engine performance as the two coupe versions, Carrera and Carrera S. In addition to the rear-wheel-drive sports cars, the all-wheel-drive Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S have also been available since July 2012.

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

From the outside, these vehicles differ from the vehicles with rear-wheel drive with a wider body and a narrow red rear light strip that runs between the two rear lights. The 257 kW and 294 kW six-cylinder engines were still available as engines.

The two most powerful vehicles were the 911 Turbo with 383 kW (520 hp) and the 911 Turbo S with 412 kW (560 hp). Both all-wheel-drive cars have a six-cylinder boxer engine with bi-turbo charging. As with the predecessors, both turbo models have wider fenders and a large rear wing on the rear axle for stable handling.

In 2013, the Turbo models also received a multi-adjustable, three-piece front spoiler made from a type of hard rubber for the first time, the outer parts of which extend automatically at a speed of 75 mph. At the push of a button, the driver can also move the middle part down in order to increase the downforce of the entire car in conjunction with the rear wing. Below 50 mph, the system returns to the starting position. 

In 2013, a special model was launched to mark the 50th anniversary of the 911; the model designation at the rear is supplemented with a red "50".

At the IAA 2015, Porsche presented a comprehensive facelift. The two basic versions of the 911 (911 Carrera and 911 Carrera S) will be delivered in December 2015 for the first time in the history of the 911 with a turbo instead of a naturally aspirated engine. This leads to a significantly higher pulling power from low engine speeds, but the 911 loses the characteristic sound of the naturally aspirated engine. In addition, the appearance has been slightly changed.

 

GT Series

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

Porsche offers the 911 GT3 for private motorsport use. The car has a non-supercharged six-cylinder boxer engine that delivers a maximum of 350 kW (475 hp) at 8250 rpm. The rear-wheel-drive car is lighter than the standard models and equipped with aerodynamic aids such as a front spoiler and a fixed rear wing. 

The GT3 will no longer be fitted with a manual gearbox like previous models, but with an electrically operated seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox, in which the driver can select gears by pressing paddles on the steering wheel or by pushing the selector lever back and forth. In automatic mode, an automatic gearshift controls the gear selection. 

In June 2017, Porsche presented the 911 GT2 RS with an output of 515 kW (700 hp) at 7000 rpm from a six-cylinder boxer engine with bi-turbo charging. This vehicle holds the lap record for street-legal sports cars on the Nordschleife of the Nürburgring.

 

Porsche 992 (2019 - Present)

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The Porsche 992 is the 8th generation of the Porsche 911. The model celebrated its world premiere on the eve of the LA Auto Show on November, 2018, in Los Angeles. Porsche presented the convertible on January, 2019. 

At the Geneva Motor Show 2020, the manufacturer wanted to present both body versions as Turbo S. However, the auto show was canceled on February 28, 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic , so the March 3, 2020 presentation was held via an online event hosted by the former F1 driver Mark Webber.

Externally, the 992 differs only in details from the previous model 991 . With regard to the platform, the change to the modular mid-engine kit (MMB) is worth mentioning. The car is 20 mm longer and 5 mm higher than its predecessor with the same wheelbase. 

The front hood and the front apron with adjustable flaps are straighter, the front fenders are larger and the wheels are 25.4 mm wider. At the rear of the 992 there is also a continuous light strip in the basic versions, which was only available on the all-wheel drive versions of the 991. The track is 40 mm wider compared to its predecessor. 

 

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

The instruments in the interior are analog except for the digital rev counter. The new equipment extras include a lane departure warning and night vision assistant as well as a parking assistant with 360-degree view.

At the start of sales, the 992 was offered with a turbocharged 3 liter EA9A2 Otto boxer engine in the Carrera S and Carrera 4S models with a rated output of 331 kW (450 hp). The Carrera followed in July 2019 with the same engine but less rated power (283 kW/385 hp). 

There is a choice of an 8-speed dual- clutch transmission or a seven-speed manual transmission. Even though a hybrid drive will follow for the first time in a Porsche 911, a purely electrically powered 992 has not been announced by Porsche yet.

The Turbo S presented in 2020 has a 3.7-liter boxer engine with an output of 478 kW (650 hp). It has an 8-speed dual-clutch transmission and all-wheel drive . The sports car accelerates to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds and has a top speed of 205 mph, like the previous model. The turbo is slightly weaker at 427 kW (580 hp). 

 

GT Series

Porsche AG

Porsche AG

 

In February 2021, Porsche presented the GT3. The first vehicles were delivered in May 2021. The GT3 was presented in June 2021 with the more discreetly designed touring package. The 992 was also presented as a GTS in June 2021. It was launched in November 2021. 

The GT3 has a four-liter naturally aspirated engine . At 375 kW (510 hp), it has slightly more power than the previous model. 60 mph should be reached in 3.4 seconds, the top speed is given as 200 mph. The GTS uses the drive from the Carrera S and Carrera 4S, but with 353 kW (480 hp) it has a little more power. It is available with both rear-wheel and all-wheel drive.

 

Conclusion

Conclusion

 

Porsche 911 is the best driver’s car ever built. People who ever had a chance to drive a nine eleven would tell you that it is different than any other car they have ever driven. That’s because it is the closest thing to a race car or even a go-kart when it comes to handling. 

Porsche had a good idea from the beginning and they stuck with it. They made rear engined, rear wheel drive vehicles with 50/50 weight distribution. At first, it looked like a radical idea that wouldn’t work but Porsche made it work right from the get go. 

Engineers at the company didn’t change their minds over the years and they just kept perfecting the formula over and over. If you drive a 911 today, you can almost feel all the heritage on your steering wheel. So, if you have a Porsche 911, you know that must protect it with all you have. 

It is not always easy to find the right protective equipment for cars like Porsche and we always recommendCoverking for all of your needs. They are the best in the market and the make the perfect equipment regardless of what you own. In Porsche’s case, there is even more. 

As car enthusiasts, everyone’s favorite car atCoverking is the Porsche 911. They create the best equipment for it, simply because they all love the vehicle and know the meaning of driving one. Please check out theircatalog and see for yourself!

 

Resources

 

Tankut Basar

Tankut Basar is an ARA (American Rally Assoc.) Racing Driver and an FIA Bronze Category License Holder. His passion for driving began with karting like most racers. He started racing internationally at the age of 22. Tankut loves everything car-related and will keep enjoying the drive until the end. 

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